The man who shut the troubled men’s jail in Baltimore has a lot more on his agenda

The man who shut the troubled men’s jail in Baltimore has a lot more on his agenda

Stephen T. Moyer was working as a deputy police chief in Florida when he heard about a jail scandal in his home state of Maryland involving a gang leader who operated a violent drug enterprise from behind bars.

Moyer was incensed, even a bit embarrassed. He thought drastic action was needed.

So when he was tapped by Gov. Larry Hogan (R) to become Maryland’s secretary of public safety and correctional services, he knew where he would focus his reform efforts: the agency’s personnel system.

The way Moyer sees it, gang leader Tavon White’s elaborate underground operation, which included sex, money and the smuggling of drugs and cellphones, would not have worked without the help of state corrections officers.

“The way you attack corruption is you look at who you are hiring, and our hiring process wasn’t good,” Moyer said, noting that dozens of the 44 people indicted in the Black Guerrilla Family case were corrections officers, and four of them gave birth to children fathered by White. “We’ve hired some bad people, and I have to figure out who the bad people are.”

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